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#21 mrRon

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 1:14 PM

Larry recently made a good post with recent and relevant links at the bottom of the following thread:
http://www.larryullm...ion/#entry11588


yes I read the article within the post . here is a quote from it

"here’s the bottom line: under the rules, which cover the whole of the European Union, websites must ask visitors for their consent before they can install most cookies."

This is ridiculous as it would require a pop-up or something on almost every website in the "world" preventing immediate surfing of that website until consent has been given by the visitor to allow information to be stored on their browser.

It doesn't make any sense why they would want to do this , it seems to me to be a bunch of people in Brussels with nothing better to do than to sit around making peoples lives as miserable as possible

wait and see next they'll be controlling the type of content you are allowed to download and eventually what Browser you use !! you might not think it , but this is facism at work .
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#22 Antonio Conte

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 1:47 PM

And third, not all cookies are subject to the rules. Data that’s considered necessary for the basic functioning of the website — the session cookies used for tracking a basket of goods up to the checkout, for example — don’t require consent, because it’s implied by the simple fact they’re trying to use the site in the first place.


I would argument that settings fall into this category, given that the cookie is only created following an action done liberally by the user of course. The same argument can be made for a cookie created after a user clicks a "remember me" check box upon login. I may be totally wrong here, but the end goal is really to prevent a website from saving personal information without communicating why and how this is done.

What do you think of the examples provided? Do you agree, folks?
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#23 HartleySan

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 6:23 PM

I agree with you, Antonio. The law mainly seems to focus on third-party cookies designed to collect lots of personal information to make better YouTube recommendations, etc.

As the article Larry linked to stated, if a cookie is central to the functioning of the site (e.g., for a shopping cart), you do not have to get consent from the user. In other words, I don't think this law will affect most sites.

Also, mrRon, I do agree with you in that the Internet is slowly being reigned in by the governments of the world. They were slow to figure it out, but now that they understand the power of and the effect the Internet has on people, they're very quickly trying to break it up and control it.
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#24 Larry

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 8:49 PM

I have three thoughts. First, as is often the case, I think governments/bureaucracies are trying to address a legitimate concern and have come up with a rather blunt, imprecise law for doing so. But, still, a reasonable interpretation of the law suggests that the law is not entirely unreasonable.

Second, I totally disagree with MrRon's assertion that "you need cookies enabled in your Browser to successfully navigate almost every website on the Internet including Google". If cookies are required to navigate a site, that site is doing something seriously wrong. Yes, cookies can be used to improve my experience, but if I'm not logging in (and a few other similar examples), cookies are absolutely not required. I highly doubt cookies need to be required by half the Web sites I visit every day, if not a higher percentage. The suggestion that cookies are required "to successfully navigate almost every website on the Internet including Google" demonstrates a lack of understanding of cookies and Web development in general.

Third, I think equating this with fascism, or even making that association at all, shows a complete lack of understanding of what fascism was. This law, flaws or not, is about consumer protection. Suggesting it's fascist, or on the road of fascism, is absurd, and I cannot take seriously the arguments of anyone who would suggest otherwise.
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#25 mrRon

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 12:21 PM

If cookies are required to navigate a site, that site is doing something seriously wrong.


what about all the shopping carts etc that use php sessions which store the session reference on a users browser before a user has even registered an account or logged in

but apart from this how do you police the new laws ,

I mean if I live in the USA or somewhere outside the eu , and I access a website hosted on servers within the EU that require me to accept cookies , do I have to be notified ?

If my website is hosted on servers located outside of the EU but I live in a country within the EU , must I notify people they need to accept cookies for a particular action .

its all so vague and really cannot be policed , again more wasted money on eurocratic decisions.
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#26 Antonio Conte

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 1:54 PM

Why do you ask these questions? Read the information in the link provided. It's all there.

- It does not matter. That kind of data storage is allowed.
- Speculation, but I would think only serious violations will be affected. The goal is to protect the end user, not ruin the Internet.
- Yes. You need to accept their cookie policy in some way if they user your private information.
- Read the article. The only thing that matters is whether your business is directed at EU or not. As Norway is not a member of the organization that is EU, I can pay for hosting in U.K and forget about all this as long as my business is mainly for Norwegians.

It is vague, but do you really think small businesses is the goal here? They want to prevent major companies like Facebook from selling the personal information of EU citizens. I don't really think they will affect your business at all, unless you do something obviously stupid. Use some common sense here. If your customers would be likely to react when told what you save about them, I would say that's a good indication. If they would most likely not, I would say you are on safe ground.

No need to be hysterical about this. Again. Read the article...
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#27 HartleySan

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 5:30 PM

Well said, Antonio, and yes, reading the article should alleviate all of your concerns, mrRon.
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